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Foraging The Mountain West: Gourmet Edible Plants, Mushrooms, and Meat.

Foraging for Edible Plants
Resources for the Wild Food Enthusiast

      It is hard to imagine that there could be any new discoveries in wild plant food research when there are so many great books and articles out there already. But much of what is in print is surprisingly inaccurate or misleading.

      For example, young milkweed shoots are delicious as a potherb and taste much like asparagus. But according to the available literature, milkweeds contain a toxic, bitter alkaloid that has to be properly cooked out to render the plants safe to eat. The proper method for cooking is to plunge the herbs into rapidly boiling water for two minutes, drain the water, then repeat the process two more times. If all bitterness is gone then the herbs are safe.

      But as you will read in the article The Milkweed Phenomenon, milkweeds in most parts of North America don't contain the bitter alkaloid, and they can be cooked and eaten without any special preparations, or even eaten raw. Sam Thayer writes:

The Forager's Harvest: A Guide to Identifying, Harvesting, and Preparing Edible Wild Plants.       "The first time that I ate milkweed shoots, it was done with extreme care. I mean, extreme. I knew that the shoots were mildly poisonous when raw and that they would be terribly bitter and still a little toxic if not cooked properly. I knew that I had to boil them in several water changes, making sure that the shoots were covered with boiling instead of cold water - for the use of cold water would “set” the bitter principle in the vegetable. I also knew that this bitterness was caused by a toxic, milky latex. I knew all of this because I had read it in half a dozen books.

Nature's Garden: A Guide to Identifying, Harvesting, and Preparing Edible Wild Plants.       Not surprisingly, such elaborate and exacting preparation requirements, with such severe consequences if wrongly performed, caused me to put off trying milkweed for several years. When so many excellent wild vegetables exist, why waste my time with one that is described as “only marginally edible”? Or so I reasoned."


      Over a period of time Sam Thayer started preparing milkweed greens with less and less caution, searching for some evidence of the bitter toxin in the plants, but never found any trace of bitterness, even when eating the young plants raw.

      Thayer realized that the bitterness was geographical, found in some parts of the country, but not others, yet all the available literature originated in places where milkweeds were bitter. Many other plants have similar stories, Thayer pointed out, delicious in some parts of the country, but positively bitter and repelling in other places.

      It was Sam Thayer's article that inspired me for the first time to try cooking and eating some milkweed greens (plunged into boiling water and cooked without changing the water). They were delicious, just like asparagus!

      Thayer later discontinued The Forager newsletter and refocussed his energy on writing books. He has since published two great books: The Forager's Harvest: A Guide to Identifying, Harvesting, and Preparing Edible Wild Plants and Nature's Garden: A Guide to Identifying, Harvesting, and Preparing Edible Wild Plants.

Edible Wild Plants: Wild Foods from Dirt to Plate.

Books about Wild Edible Plants
-Foraging the Mountain West by Thomas J. Elpel and Kris Reed
-The Forager's Harvest by Samuel Thayer
-Nature's Garden by Samuel Thayer
-Edible Wild Plants by John Kallas, PhD
-A Taste of Heritage by Alma Hogan Snell
-The Essential Wild Food Survival Guide by Linda Runyon
-Guide to Wild Foods and Useful Plants by Christopher Nyerges
-The Encyclopedia of Edible Plants of N.A. by Francois Couplan
-Participating in Nature: Wilderness Survival and Primitive Living Skills

Wild Edible and Medicinal Plant Videos
-Wild Edible Basics DVD by Wildman Steve Brill
-Exploring Edible Wild Foods DVD by Christopher Nyerges

Edible Plants Articles & FAQ's
Articles from Forager's Harvest Newsletter by Sam Thayer
The Milkweed Phenomenon (from Volume 1, Issue 2. June-July 2001)
Making Your Own Apple Pectin (Volume 1, Issue 3. August-September 2001)
Highbush Cranberry (Volume 1, Issue 4. Fall-Winter 2001)
Hopniss: North America's best wild tuber? (Volume 2, Issue 3. Summer/Fall 2002)
Edible Wild Plants Questions & Answers with Thomas J. Elpel

Also of interest, be sure to check out the Wild Food Adventurer Newsletter published by John Kallas is still going strong. It is an excellent wildfoods newsletter, and Sam Thayer has been a frequent contributor.

See what Sigma III Survival School has to say about Botany in a Day:

Botany in a Day: The Patterns Method of Plant Identification
Check out Botany in a Day for a unique way to learn about plants and their uses.

Return to the Wildflowers & Weeds Home Page.

Books
authored by
Thomas J. Elpel
Roadmap to Reality: Consciousness, Worldviews, andthe Blossoming of Human Spirit
Roadmap
to Reality
Living Homes: Stone Masonry, Log, and Strawbale Construction
Living
Homes
Participating in Nature: Wilderness Survival and Primitive Living Skills.
Participating
in Nature
Foraging the Mountain West: Gourmet Edible Plants, Mushrooms, and Meat.
Foraging the
Mountain West
Botany in a Day: The Patterns Method of Plant Identification
Botany
in a Day
Shanleya's Quest: A Botany Adventure for Kids
Shanleya's
Quest

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